Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Cruising Freycinet and the Friendly Beaches

This was our view this morning across Great Oyster Bay towards the Hazards, from "Dunwerkin".

We'd booked a Wineglass Bay cruise to take us around the inaccessible southern and eastern coastline of Freycinet National Park, all the way to Wineglass Bay where we'd walked yesterday.
We were lucky to have such calm and clear conditions - perfect for viewing this pristine coastal environment and the wild life........plenty more cormorants, pelicans..... 


 dozens and dozens of dolphins, playing races with our cruiser.........
 and surfing the wake of the boat - just for our benefit.........
 .......and flocks of albatrosses feeding off schools of fish (probably disturbed by yellow fin tuna - according to our skipper).

As we rounded the southern tip of the peninsula, alongside the rocky granite outcrops of Schouten Island, the swells became more pronounced and the wind intensified.........and we entered Australian fur seal territory..........
.......... before heading into the calm waters at the southern end of Wineglass Bay. 
 and a delicious lunch (and glass of local Riesling) of all Tasmanian products.


The waters of Wineglass Bay are so pristine and translucent that it looks like we are anchored in very shallow water - we're surprised to find out it is actually about 6 metres deep here. It's impossible to imagine the brutal way Wineglass Bay got its name (goes back to its days as a whaling base and has to do with being filled with crimson blood apparently!!!!!!)
The 4 hour cruise has surpassed all our expectations. We anticipated we would see some stunning scenery but the wildlife sightings and the care and attention of the crew were real highlights for us today.

We spent our last afternoon in Freycinet checking out the "Friendly Beaches", about a 25 minute drive NE of Coles Bay.

 I did well to capture this little dancing hooded plover in this shot........
 and I know this is only a seagull......
The pink granite rocks and the silica rich pure white sand of the Friendly Beaches are very photogenic, especially when the vibrant orange lichen covering the rocks plays off the available light. I've learnt from this trip that you only see lichen like this in pristine environments - where algae and fungal growths are in perfect symbiosis. 




We ended off a wonderful day with a glass of Pagan quince cider on Dunwerkin's deck, and a toast to the many wonders of Tasmania!


1 comment:

Roslyn Lawrence said...

What beautiful photos and makes me really want to visit. Your blog looks like an amazing tour to do. We will certainly keep as a reference. Looks like you having fun, and looks freezing. So much for visiting in Autumn. xxx